Blog Post

DEC
05
2013

Keeping Your Most Valued Employees Happy

While the team researched content about retaining employees, we found this great article by Richard Branson about retaining employees

“The trick is to ensure that your staff feels empowered. As your team members grow into their jobs, give them real responsibilities: Theyll respect you for it and do everything they can to rise to the challenge.” ~ Richard Branson

Larry had some great philosophies about employees. He said, “A fair day’s work for a fair day’s pay describes one type of relationship between an employee and employer that probably serves both well enough. But I’m idealistic enough to think it should go beyond that.  If you’re going to spend 5 years with us or 10 years with us I would hope there will be something along the way that is more fulfilling.

For our part, we try to provide quality jobs – quality meaning stability and a job where you don’t have to look over your shoulder or worry about a supervisor or manager having a bad day.  Quality also means long-term and an environment of respect.

People progress up the material fulfillment chain by satisfying (1) their needs; (2) lifestyle; then (3) security.”

 

What are some of your tips to keep your best employees happy?

 

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  1. Aj42 Reply

    The last question posed in this article is: “What are some of the tips to keep your best employees happy?”
    Wow. Great question. My mind races through many employees and the specific programs, tools, motivations, processes, etc. that I’ve been a part of -all geared toward employee empowerment and contentment. In trying to come up with the most broad-range, universal tip that would apply to all of them the winner is: be trustworthy.
    Let’s face it, the opportunity to be trusted is given, but real trust is earned. My initial “tips” included things like providing a challenging job; the right tools to get the job done; genuine, specific, and sincere appreciation; transparency; and building teams that tick. So why Trustworthiness? Because almost any of the things on my list fall flat without it. If an employee, peer, boss, etc. can’t count on my word or my accountability, then all I’ve really done is burden and reduce happiness and productivity. If trust is there – things move. It if isn’t – things slug slowly on because employees have to be suspect of their work, my work and The Work.
    My tip: be trustworthy.

    • millerinspiration Reply

      Thank you for the feedback, Aj42. You make a great point. Just today, one of the vice presidents in the Larry H. Miller Group of Companies was telling a story about Larry Miller. She said, “If Larry shook your hand, you had a deal. And even if it was to his detriment, he wouldn’t unwind it.” That is the definition of trustworthy.

      Thanks again for sharing. All the best to you in your endeavors!

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